Backyard Wild Yeast Plum Mead – Part I

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This is a bit of a risky kind of brew, but I will give it a go anyway.

Some fruits come with a natural coat of wild yeast on their skin. This can be beneficial to your brew, but dangerous, because wild yeast can infect your brew.

The way this mead was done was:

  1. Pick the healthier plums from your tree. In this case, I picked them from my own backyard;

  1. See the white coating? This is the wild yeast on the fruit. The aim of this brew is to use that yeast and that alone to kick start the fermentation. This mead is expected to be low in alcohol, so that the fermentation is quick and it gives less times for any infection to develop;

  1. After a quick rinse, the plums are deseeded and quickly hand pulped. This would make homebrewers cringe, but I did sanitize my hands well! Well, back in the day, wine juice was extracted by stepping on grapes, so why not use my hands? Then soak them on a solution of water, honey, lime and lime zest, which was boiled for one hour. Dump the boiling water onto the plums and close the fermenting bin. That’s it. Give it a bit of a mix for the next two days and leave it. A bit of natural selection, after the boiling water in dumped, only the strongest yeast will survive!

Ingredients

  1. 2.5kg of deseeded plums;
  2. 2.5kg of honey;
  3. 13L of water;
  4. Juice and zest of 2 limes;

Updates will follow.

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5 thoughts on “Backyard Wild Yeast Plum Mead – Part I

  1. Interesting. How does it taste. My in-laws used to make wine like this with elderflowers. Made and ready to drink in a few days. It was rather sweet, but quite pleasant.

    • Elderflower Mead

      This is my elderflower drink! It was probably my most successful brew, together with my beetroot mead. It is great to play around! I was going to try to brew with the natural yeast of elderflower, but it would work with the natural yeast so much, given the amount of sugar and high alcohol content. Honey kills yeast quite quickly. Unless you are aiming for a low alcohol mead, sweet mead, there isn’t enough yeast in the petals, but it is sooo tasty! I love it!

      It’s great to play around! One of the wonders of homebrewing!

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