Living in Bhutan – 8 Months Now!

Living in Bhutan – 8 Months Experience

Living in Bhutan has been a fantastic experience so far. I cannot believe that it has already been 8 months since I arrived at the Land of the Thunder Dragon!

I have experienced so much living here, and I am so happy that we have been enjoying and adapting well to our lives in such a different place.

Treks in Bhutan: The Owl Trek-Vila de Dhur

Living in Bhutan – Challenges

Bhutan is another world. The country almost completely skipping the industrial revolution, so anything and everything you need must be imported. This brings prices up quite a lot on pretty much anything at all.

Do you like spicy food? Well, you will get plenty of that in Bhutan! People here seem not to know the concept of spice, so everything is mouth burning! But after a while you get used to it!

The main challenges so far, for me, is to deal with the easy going nature of the Bhutanese… too easy going, if you ask me! Anything that you need sorted, if you are lucky and extremely insistent, will take months to get resolved. This is quite annoying when you have been raised on a sense or urgency for anything!

I have been blessed with the opportunity to come to this amazing place, but by God, it is not easy!

Living in Bhutan – Rewards

As some of you know, I am a teacher. Teaching in Bhutan, to the demographics I am currently teaching, is one of the most beautiful things in the world. I have been teaching children from a disadvantaged background and it has been extremely difficult, but even more rewarding.

Treks in Bhutan: The OWL Trek-Rhododendron

Bhutan is almost untouched. The main advantage of having skipped the industrial age is that the country’s wildlife and nature are still barely touched. Everywhere you look, there are trees, birds etc. It is a paradise for outdoorsy people! Recently, I read about a trek on Mochilao a Dois, called “Bumthang Owl Trek” (click to read more!). It is great trek, full of rhododendrons along the way.

Treks in Bhutan: The OWL Trek-on the way to Drange La Pass

There are many more experiences to share, but I will keep them for future posts! Thanks for stopping by!

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Life Changing Decisions – Move to Bhutan

After a long time promising to get back at posting, I have officially a good excuse. I now live in The Happiest Country on Earth: The Kingdom of Bhutan!

I am now a teacher in the Kingdom of Bhutan, one of the most closed countries in the planet,
and I made it here through a series of personal turmoil. Over the last two and a bit years, my life changed quite a bit. I went from clinically depressed to finishing my Ph.D, moving back to Brazil, teaching for one year in one of the most prestigious schools in the American Continent,
giving that up, getting married and giving up a great job to move to the Land of the Thunder Dragon.


Why Bhutan? So many people have asked me this questions and I don’t really have a single answer. It is a combination of factors. Bhutan is one of the most difficult countries to enter in the world. Its culture is still so untouched, there is so much to explore… etc etc… but the main reason is: I prefer to regret having taken this opportunity than wonder about what could have been.


What the decision difficult to make? Well, not really! I had the will to throw myself at this opportunity and the support from my family and my then girlfriend. So much so that we got married in 12 days and she is here with me! Want better support than this?


Why give up a great job? It was not easy. I liked my previous job quite a lot! Loved the people I worked with and I felt bad having left the job. It is not easy to quit, is it? They were also very supportive. I really wanted the opportunity to work with underprivileged children in a country that is supporting its Education System with everything it has. It is inspiring to see how fast Education is progressing.


Is Bhutan changing your life? Another question that everyone asks me all the time. I am an avid traveller and think that our lives are changed at every moment, every day, by every experience, it does not matter how small it is. Coming to a highly spiritual country, still so ingrained in Buddhism does change one’s life, but not in the way that you’d think. It is another set of experience that will, in whatever way, have an impact in my life. How? I don’t know! I just want to absorb as much of the culture as I possibly can.


Next? I will be posting a series of more detailed posts about my experiences here. Keep yourself tuned! My first experience can be read at http://www.mochilaoadois.com.br/festival-paro-tshechu/.