Mo’ Mead – MelonMel Melon Mead: Done!

Hi all!

Well, it’s finally ready! My birthday melon mead is bottled and ready to be drank!

It has a very pungent smell of melon, way more than I expected and a very subtle taste. Even though you can smell the melon, there is only an aftertaste of melon in the mead, which was quite interesting! This time, I made a lot, 20 bottles worth! If the help of a friend, we managed to clean everything, bottle two different meads (the other will come in a different post) and transfer the wild plum to secondary. It was quite an effort, but it paid off! Now just wait to mature so that it can be better enjoyed!

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Backyard Wild Yeast Plum Mead – Part I

THis post contains 3 photos. Click to enlarge them.

This is a bit of a risky kind of brew, but I will give it a go anyway.

Some fruits come with a natural coat of wild yeast on their skin. This can be beneficial to your brew, but dangerous, because wild yeast can infect your brew.

The way this mead was done was:

  1. Pick the healthier plums from your tree. In this case, I picked them from my own backyard;

  1. See the white coating? This is the wild yeast on the fruit. The aim of this brew is to use that yeast and that alone to kick start the fermentation. This mead is expected to be low in alcohol, so that the fermentation is quick and it gives less times for any infection to develop;

  1. After a quick rinse, the plums are deseeded and quickly hand pulped. This would make homebrewers cringe, but I did sanitize my hands well! Well, back in the day, wine juice was extracted by stepping on grapes, so why not use my hands? Then soak them on a solution of water, honey, lime and lime zest, which was boiled for one hour. Dump the boiling water onto the plums and close the fermenting bin. That’s it. Give it a bit of a mix for the next two days and leave it. A bit of natural selection, after the boiling water in dumped, only the strongest yeast will survive!

Ingredients

  1. 2.5kg of deseeded plums;
  2. 2.5kg of honey;
  3. 13L of water;
  4. Juice and zest of 2 limes;

Updates will follow.

Wild Blackberry Mead… A Simple Name for Once

This post contains 5 photos.

In the earlier post about fruit picking, the purpose of my picked fruits is the usual: homebrew. Blackberry are bloody expensive and farmed ones are not as delicious! Anyway, In a few months, I will have, hopefully, a very delicious drink!

I favour brewing mead over other drinks because, well, I prefer to other drinks and it’s the one that is most difficult to mess up. Why? Honey, that’s why!

Ingredients:

  • 440g of blackberries for primary and another 440g for secondary (I picked 880g, the second half has been frozen);
  • Zest and juice of one lemon;
  • 1.5kg of honey;
  • Enough water to complete 5L;
  • D-47 yeast.

First, sterilize all the equipment. Leave the berries soaking in cold water and remove any creepy crawlers that float up (hey, it’s organic stuff!)

Place the berries in the demijohn (the glass fermenting thingy). There might still be some bacteria/wild yeast/general oganisms that need to be killed.


Want to sterilize fruit? Want to sterilize anything? Cover it in honey! Add half of the honey into the demijohn and leave the fruits soaking in it. Honey is anti-everything… it will kill wild yeast and other fungi, bacteria, any tiny organism in and around the berries + all the health benefits. If the amount of honey added is kept high, the likelihood of infections in your brew decrease quite a lot.


That’s why it’s hard to get mead wrong. Sanitation and infections are a big problem in wine and beer, but mead has the power of honey to back it up! Pretty cool, right?


After a good honey soaking for about 30 minutes, add 1.5L of boiling water to the demijohn and let it sit for another few minutes. Close it with the airlock/blow tube. Even though mead is harder to infect, don’t take chances! Further sterilization will occur, but this step is most important to dissolve the honey, mostly.


In a sauce pan, heat the water add the honey, lemon juice and zest. Mix until the honey has been dissolved. Add it to the demijohn and close it again. Only pitch the yeast when the most is below 25C.


Let it ferment for a minimum of 10 days (fermentation is about to stop usually when the airlock is producing only one bubble every 4 minutes). Move to secondary fermentation, add the other half of the berries still frozen and let it ferment for another 3 weeks. Then move to tertiary fermentation for another 3 weeks. The mead should be clear and ready for bottling at this stage.

It takes a long time to make it, but trust me, it’s worth it!

MelonMel Melon Mead (Tongue Twister?)

It’s even difficult to say it, right?

I have been meaning to make a big batch of mead, since I haven’t attempted to make anything larger than 10L yet. In a local shop, close to my house, melon were on sale, so why not try to brew with it?

Melon has very little sugar… very, very little, so don’t expect to get much alcohol from it! 99% of the alcohol from this brew is coming from the honey.

For this brew, I used 4.5kg of honey, 3.9kg of the core of melon (weighed only the edible part), zest and juice of three lemons and a hand full of raisins. Let me know if you’d like me to explain the “whys” of the ingredients.

Boiled the fruit and the honey with a bit of water for 45mins, then strained it into a sterilized fermenting bin and topped up to 19L. The yeast here used is D47. The OG of the brew is 1.071 and I am expecting a FG of 0.995.

I will keep you updated on the progress! I am very interested on the final result!




Homebrew Labels: Some Photoshop-ing/GIMP-ing

This post contains 8 labels. Click on the label to enlarge.

Some “art” work for my homebrew! A bit of a random post, but I’d like to think that I am very thorough with my brews! From the sanitation to the labelling. I am lagging behind the label making, but I will catch up as soon as I have some time.

  1. Wagerberg Original Lager
  2. Just your ordinary lager, blond and clear! Earlier post!

  1. WillHoneyWeiss Spiced Honey Weiss Beer
  2. Weissbier seasoned with orange peel and coriander Earlier post!

  1. Tobias KinderDoppelBock
  2. High gravity bock-style lager.

  1. StrawberLy GarWeiss Strawberry Banana WeissBier
  2. Wheat beer with fresh strawberries added to secondary fermentation, using yeast which leaves a hint of banana flavour in the beer. That’s technology for ya!

  1. Wagerberg Backyard Plum Wine
  2. Plum wine made with fresh plums from my own backyard! Probably the cheapest brew yet! Less than 50p per bottle.

  1. StrawberLy Mead
  2. Simple dry mead, with strawberry added to secondary and tertiary fermentation.

  1. Feel the Beet Beetroot Mead
  2. Experimental recipe which worked very well! Earlier post!

  1. Ray Teabaggins Tea Ale
  2. Pale Ale with 24-hour cold brew tea added before bottling.


Time is on my side! Part II

About one month ago, I started growing some beetroot seeds. Here is the post. After a couple of weeks, only three seeds had come up. I didn’t really understand why, so I decided to leave it there and plant some more, but bring these to my room. I found out why my beets were not growing… because the seeds were gone! How, you may ask? A pigeon was eating them on a daily basis, but now they are protected! The summer beetroot mead is back on! Looking healthy!