Backyard Wild Yeast Plum Mead – Part I

THis post contains 3 photos. Click to enlarge them.

This is a bit of a risky kind of brew, but I will give it a go anyway.

Some fruits come with a natural coat of wild yeast on their skin. This can be beneficial to your brew, but dangerous, because wild yeast can infect your brew.

The way this mead was done was:

  1. Pick the healthier plums from your tree. In this case, I picked them from my own backyard;

  1. See the white coating? This is the wild yeast on the fruit. The aim of this brew is to use that yeast and that alone to kick start the fermentation. This mead is expected to be low in alcohol, so that the fermentation is quick and it gives less times for any infection to develop;

  1. After a quick rinse, the plums are deseeded and quickly hand pulped. This would make homebrewers cringe, but I did sanitize my hands well! Well, back in the day, wine juice was extracted by stepping on grapes, so why not use my hands? Then soak them on a solution of water, honey, lime and lime zest, which was boiled for one hour. Dump the boiling water onto the plums and close the fermenting bin. That’s it. Give it a bit of a mix for the next two days and leave it. A bit of natural selection, after the boiling water in dumped, only the strongest yeast will survive!

Ingredients

  1. 2.5kg of deseeded plums;
  2. 2.5kg of honey;
  3. 13L of water;
  4. Juice and zest of 2 limes;

Updates will follow.

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Backyard wildlife… I wish I had a macro lens

Well… if you really follow my blog, you are aware that I am an amateur home-brewer. One of my favourite brews to date was my backyard plum wine. Backyard? Yes, I have a plum tree in my backyard that, every summer, gave a wee bit of plum, but never enough for something serious and, most of them, were not very tasty.

I decided to start feeding the few bees a couple of years ago with some water and sugar and, suddenly, there were a lot more! With the arrival of the new bees, came a plentiful harvest! A lot more plums than I knew what to do with.

This year, there will be loads more! And I’ve been caring for the bees and now, the ladybugs are around too.

As most of you know, the population of bees are declining all around the world, mostly due to agriculture and its by-products. Bees need a safe place to make nests and get on with their business and nothing better than your backyard.

Remember, most of the delicious foods that are posted here are available, thanks to these amazing creatures!