Living in Bhutan – 8 Months Now!

Living in Bhutan – 8 Months Experience

Living in Bhutan has been a fantastic experience so far. I cannot believe that it has already been 8 months since I arrived at the Land of the Thunder Dragon!

I have experienced so much living here, and I am so happy that we have been enjoying and adapting well to our lives in such a different place.

Treks in Bhutan: The Owl Trek-Vila de Dhur

Living in Bhutan – Challenges

Bhutan is another world. The country almost completely skipping the industrial revolution, so anything and everything you need must be imported. This brings prices up quite a lot on pretty much anything at all.

Do you like spicy food? Well, you will get plenty of that in Bhutan! People here seem not to know the concept of spice, so everything is mouth burning! But after a while you get used to it!

The main challenges so far, for me, is to deal with the easy going nature of the Bhutanese… too easy going, if you ask me! Anything that you need sorted, if you are lucky and extremely insistent, will take months to get resolved. This is quite annoying when you have been raised on a sense or urgency for anything!

I have been blessed with the opportunity to come to this amazing place, but by God, it is not easy!

Living in Bhutan – Rewards

As some of you know, I am a teacher. Teaching in Bhutan, to the demographics I am currently teaching, is one of the most beautiful things in the world. I have been teaching children from a disadvantaged background and it has been extremely difficult, but even more rewarding.

Treks in Bhutan: The OWL Trek-Rhododendron

Bhutan is almost untouched. The main advantage of having skipped the industrial age is that the country’s wildlife and nature are still barely touched. Everywhere you look, there are trees, birds etc. It is a paradise for outdoorsy people! Recently, I read about a trek on Mochilao a Dois, called “Bumthang Owl Trek” (click to read more!). It is great trek, full of rhododendrons along the way.

Treks in Bhutan: The OWL Trek-on the way to Drange La Pass

There are many more experiences to share, but I will keep them for future posts! Thanks for stopping by!

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The Conquest of Mount Roraima

It all started when I was about 7 years of age, at least as far as I can remember, when my never-ending obsession with maps begun. I found an old Atlas in my house and started attempting to find out the name of places. In Brazil, we have a saying “do Oiapoque ao Chuí”, supposedly the northern and southernmost point in Brazil (which it is now widely known that Oiapoque is not, but this is for another post), so I set off looking where this Oiapoque was, just by using a simple ruler, I started to question that the northernmost was not in the state of Amapá, but it was in the state of Roraima, and to be more precise, very close to the triple border with Venezuela and Guyana.


View of Mount Roraima and Mount Kukenan along the trail

A little while down the road (23 years later), but never forgetting about that mysterious mountain, I had some time off and, that mountain that seemed to be so far away, is no more! Within a week, I had bought the tickets and booked a guide to take me to the top.

In this post, I will attempt to give a short summary of my experience on the way to that place that caught my attention many years ago.

Day 1 – From Paraitepuy to Rio Tök Camping Site

In Santa Elena de Uairén, in Venezuela, we hired a guide to help us up the mountain. After much research, we contacted Leopoldo, and the actual guide that took us up was Gerardo Gallegos. Salt of the earth guy. We then set off to our trip, on a 4×4 to Paraitepuy. On the way, we picked up one of the carriers, and reached the village. Short after the park fees (B$2000, around €0.50), we set off.


View of Mount Roraima along the trail

The first leg of the trek is mostly flat. A small steep hill took us by surprise right in the beginning, but when reaching the top of this hill, you see Mount Roraima and Mount Kukenan on the horizon. They seem quite far away, really far away.

Of we go! A 14km walk awaited us. The scenery made it all the better, while the fear slowly started to set in. That fantasy that I had to go to the top of that flat-top mountain was starting to become a reality with every step I took. And it was getting closer… and closer… until we finally reached the camping site. That classical image of the Roraima to the right and Kukenan to the left greeted us with a very clear evening, a couple of hours before the sunset.

While look at Roraima, we waited for the sun to set behind us. Sunset Schunset, right? That massive wall being radiated from outer space took my breath away! I couldn’t take enough photos! In order to save battery, I put the old camera down and just appreciated the view.

A quick stroll down, there was a bit of time to take a bath at the really cold River Tök. Time to get warm, have some food and rest and get ready for day 2! Check out day 2, 3 etc on Mochilao a Dois!.


View of Mount Kukenan at sunset

For more details and information on a trip to Mount Roraima, visit this post on Mount Roraima by Mochilao a Dois or check out instagram @mochilaoadois for more photos